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Large rivers have been selected as one of the satellite topics both within WP3 and WP4, because of their particular features which could not be analysed in the case study catchments framework. Large rivers are considered rivers with a catchment larger than 10,000 km and > 100 m/s. This encompasses rivers such as the Danube, Rhine, Rhône, Ebro, Vistula but also major tributaries such as the Sava, Narew, and Main rivers. Most fulfil major socio-economic functions, which will remain strongly modified and thus direct the options for rehabilitation. Because of their multifunctional use, large rivers can often only be partially rehabilitated or mitigated to achieve Good Ecological Potential according to the Water Framework Directive. This report addresses both hydrological modifications and restoration (rehabilitation, mitigation) following a DPSIR approach for six case studies that are spread across Europe

3.5_Satellite topic Large Rivers 09 Nov 2015-def.pdf

Submitted by tom.buijse@delt... on

Fluvial communities and their ecological integrity are the result of their evolutionary adaptation to river habitats. Flowing water is the main driver for development and maintenance of these habitats, which is why environmental flows (e-Flows) are needed where societal demands are depleting water resources. Fluvial habitats are not only the result of water flow, however, but are shaped by the combined interaction of water, sediments woody/organic material, and riparian vegetation. Water abstraction, flow regulation by dams, gravel pits or siltation by fine sediments eroded from hillslopes are pressures that can disturb interactions among water, sediments, and other constituents that create the habitats needed by fluvial communities.

Present e-Flow design criteria are based only on water flow requirements. Here we argue that sediment dynamics need to be considered when specifying instream flows , thereby expanding the environmental objectives and definition of e-Flows to include sediments (extended e-Flows).

7.7 Policy discussion paper III Linking e-flows to sediment dynamics FINAL.pdf

Submitted by tom.buijse@delt... on

Analyses of costs and benefits require the prediction of the effects of restoration measures and the quantification of societal values. Both of these estimates are uncertain. In this report, some of the key issues related to the assessment, description and quantification of uncertainty are discussed and guidelines are provided for considering uncertainty.

This report provides a brief overview on the representation and quantification of uncertainty in scientific prediction followed by examples of typical risks associated with river restoration that could lead to unintended, adverse effects and in more detail, how uncertainty can be considered in CEA/CBA and in MCDA.

5.4 Risks and Uncertainty in River Rehabilitation - FINAL.pdf

Submitted by tom.buijse@delt... on

These are the paths that this project uses. The camera travels along the green path, stopping at each hard angle, while looking at corresponding locations on the red path. The nodosaur is too tiny to be seen from this view—it’s nestled within the redpath.

The shortest path between two points is a line, but that’s not necessarily how I wanted my camera to move. Three.js has well documented functions for various types of 3D curves that I used according to how I wanted my camera to transition. The curve functions all come with a curve.getPoint() method, which gives a point in 3D space according to a distance along the curve. So, when scrolling a certain distance of a page—say I’m 1/3 of the way through, or approximately .33—I can take that .33, plug it into the curve.getPoint() method, and it will give me a 3D position along the curve according to thatdistance.

I’m drawing lines between camera locations, but I’m also drawing lines between where the the camera should be pointed. As the reader scrolls down the page, the camera’s position and orientation are transitioned along these linesaccordingly.

Learning the terms “slerp” and “lerp” were also helpful in finding answers to 3D camera rotation problems. In D3.js you hear a lot about interpolation, which is how you transition one value to another. If you do so constantly over time, that’s called l inear int erp olation. In the 3D graphics world it’s shortened to “lerp.” There’s another term called “slerp,” which is s pherical l inear int erp olation. It means transitioning from one point to another along a spherical curve .

While I didn’t do much slerping in this project, I did try some in my journey of trial and error. Understanding the terminology for the world of 3D graphics allowed me to do better searches to find answers that I needed. The key lesson was to try to be aware of domain jargon, which is actually really helpful when doingresearch.

At this point, I have a tour, I have scenes to transition between, and I’ve prepared some variations on a few different scenes for desktop and mobile. But that’s not enough to guarantee that everything I intend to be seen will be seen on various screen sizes, given that I’m making is a fixed-position, full-viewport presentation. For example, while I recorded scenes for “desktop”, they’re really a series of settings that look good at the exact arbitrary pixel size/ratio of my browser somewhere floating in my external monitor. If I do nothing, when someone else sees the dinosaur in their other-sized browser, it will be cropped, or float in a larger black void. Instead, the idea was to make each 3D scene responsive, gently nudging scene settings to ensure that an invisible 3D bounding sphere always fits within the user’s view. Unfortunately, you can’t just use media queries inWebGL.

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© 2016 Smart911 TM . All Rights Reserved.

Smart911 holds U.S. Patents – 6,600,812; 8,484,352; 8,516,122; 9,078,092; Patents Pending.

Connect With Us
© 2016 Smart911 TM . All Rights Reserved.

Smart911 holds U.S. Patents – 6,600,812; 8,484,352; 8,516,122; 9,078,092; Patents Pending.